Where the Healing Begins

I was going to write a post about the tragic circumstances that recently took place in Moncton when three RCMP officers lost their lives in the line of duty, but I don’t think I want this post to go that way. Instead, I want to write about the outpouring of support and love that followed this tragic event. Too often we focus on the event, something that we are helpless to do anything about. While it is important to report the facts, to allow time for grieving, it’s also important to allow the healing process to start.

Last weekend while we were in Moncton, a few missed turns put right down Mainstreet and the Codiac Detachment of the RCMP. I snapped a quick photo as a reminder of how communities pull together during times of grief and sorrow. It is during these times that we realize just how far those community ties reach.
Moncton

 

Signs were up all over the city, showing their support for the women and men who keep us safe.

moncton2

I thought this quote from the assistant commissioner of New Brunswick, Roger Brown said it quite well.

“Walking in front of the detachment and seeing it transformed into a community memorial to our three fallen members left me overwhelmed. While it’s usually our job to look after the community, this time the community looked after us.”

While none of these things will bring back the three officers it is a starting place for the healing process. In time all wounds heal, we hear that again and again, but where wounds heal a scab takes its place and eventually a scar forms— a constant reminder of the past and what has been lost. Some wounds can never truly go away, but still we move on.

Moncton, our thoughts and prayers continue.

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25 Comments

  1. Torry Sullivan

     /  June 21, 2014

    We’ll said Luara!

    Reply
  2. syr ruus

     /  June 21, 2014

    Lovely image Laura. We all have our wounds and scabs and scars, but some take much longer to heal.

    Reply
    • Yes, Syr, we all have our wounds, something we sometimes tend to forget. Healing can sometimes take a very long time.

      Reply
  3. I like your approach to this unfortunate event. Rehashing the details of the tragedy doesn’t change it. Time and the support of the community pulling together is all that is left.

    Reply
  4. what a heartbreaking time this was and continues to be. to see the community, from the intimate circle, to the the city to the wider community of those farther away draw together with prayer, with candles, with support in so many ways is wonderful. We are reminded of how much we need one another. thank you for this lovely post.

    Reply
    • It was heart-breaking indeed, Joss and certainly shows us that we do need the strength and love from others during times of tribulation. It is what community is all about.

      Reply
  5. I do love how communities come together in times of tragedy like this. Sorry for their losses.

    Reply
    • Thanks, Patti. Yes, it has been a very sad time for Canadians, and Maritimers especially. Community draws us together. Thank God.

      Reply
  6. Beautiful! I am amazed at how communities pull together in times of crisis. Our communities are extended families.

    Reply
    • You’re exactly right, Susan. And I honestly don’t know how we would get through these times without the love and support of those around us.

      Reply
  7. Linda

     /  June 21, 2014

    I heard Mr.Rodgers say hjs mom told him in times like this dont look at or for evil ..watch and look at all the good people that show up and watch what they do ..see the difference kindness can make….

    Reply
    • That’s so true, Linda. It would be easy to only look for the negative in these situations, and it wouldn’t accomplish a thing. At least by looking for the good things we have something solid and true to take forward with us.

      Reply
  8. What a beautiful tribute this post is, Laura. I love that you made note that time does not heal all … and while it is true that the scar never goes away … we do in time learn to live with it and that allows us to remember those who are lost. You can be proud of your community and for yourself that this tragedy has become something that did not tear people apart, but brought them together. My thoughts and prayers are with you :)

    Reply
    • Yes, learning to live with the scars is part of life. Many times the pain is there, dormant, but ever present. Community brings us together, strength comes when we join together.

      Reply
  9. Too moved for words. A fitting tribute.

    Reply
  10. Thanks for such eloquent words, Laura. A wonderful tribute.

    Reply
  11. Nicely said, Laura.
    Just four weeks earlier a friend and I were in Moncton to a concert at the Moncton Wesleyan Celebration Centre. Having recently been there, this whole tragic and horrific event seemed even more alarming to me. It’s all so pointless, the killing, and I shed a lot of tears while watching the touching funeral service on TV. The outpouring of support was very moving.

    Reply
    • It was a very emotional time. The service was very touching, difficult at times to watch. Such a waste. Moncton feels like our second home since our daughter lives very close by.

      Reply
  12. I watched it on television, and before, during and since that tragedy there have been multiple shootings reported around metro Vancouver… several of them… plus the ongoing unrest in other places of the world. It saddens me that people never seem to learn that violence doesn’t solve anything. I don’t think we could survive it without those who come together offering love and support.

    Reply
    • I absolutely agree, Carol. I just don’t understand violence whatsoever. I sometimes turn the news off. There doesn’t seem to be anything good reported and it just makes me sad. To think we have this beautiful planet to live and yet we can’t all get along.

      Reply

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