Local Fiction for the Adult Reader in you.

Last week I made a few suggestions of books to buy for the young (at heart) person on your list, but I really think it’s only fair that I mention some homegrown adult fiction books this time.

Syr Ruus Devils Hump cover July_2013_proof (1)1.Devil’s Hump by Syr Ruus. I have my own signed copy of this book that I shall treasure forever. The book can be purchased at Coles in Bridgewater, the Lahave Bakery, the Riverhouse in Petite Reviere or directly from the author- Syr (at)eastlink.ca . The winter of 1921 turned bad for all the Islanders, bringing one unexpected thing after another… beginning with the -quarantine, then the discovery f the deaths of the entire Ross family, followed by the fire and the acquittal of the Turnbull brothers. The storm of talk hadn’t even reached full crest, when a new development ensued. Devil’s Hump depicts the unique and disappearing culture of a maritime island community. It tells the story of Aaron Ross who, in spite of devastating circumstances, is able to survive alone on a small secluded island. But more than this, it celebrates the power of the human imagination which can shape our lives and make even the most difficult situations bearable. 

41B-l6NKWgL._AA160_2.The Deception of Livvy Higgs by Donna Morrissey. I also have a signed copy of  Donna’s book . For two traumatic days, Livvy Higgs is besieged by a series of small heart attacks while the ghost of her younger self leads her back through a past devastated by lies and secrets. The story opens in Halifax in 2009, travels back to the French Shore of Newfoundland during the mid-thirties and the heyday of the Maritime shipping industry, makes its way to wartorn Halifax during the battle of the Atlantic in World War II, then leaps ahead to the bedside of the elder Livvy. Caught between a troubled past, and her present and worsening living conditions, Livvy is forced to pick apart the lies and secrets told by her greedy, prideful father, Durwin Higgs, who judges her a failure, and her formidable Grandmother Creed, who has mysteriously aligned herself with Livvy”s father, despite their mutual hatred. Tending to Livvy during her illness is her young next-door neighbor  Gen, a single mother and social-work student. Overnight, a violent scene embroils the two in each other”s lives in a manner that will entwine them forever. In The Deception of Livvy Higgs, the inimitable Morrissey has written a powerful tale, the Stone Angel of the East Coast.

Virgin cure3.The Virgin Cure by Ami MacKay  Set on the streets of Lower Manhattan in 1871, The Virgin Cure is the story of Moth, a girl abandoned by her father and raised by a mother telling fortunes to the city’s desperate women. One summer night, twelve-year-old Moth is pulled from her bed and sold as a servant to a finely dressed woman. It is this betrayal suffered at the hands of her own mother that changes her life forever. Knowing that her mother is so close while she is locked away in servitude, Moth bides her time until she can escape, only to find her old home deserted and her mother gone without a trace. Moth must struggle to survive alone in the murky world of the Bowery, a wild and lawless enclave filled with thieves, beggars, sideshow freaks, and prostitutes. She eventually meets Miss Everett, the proprietress of an “Infant School,” a brothel that caters to gentlemen who pay dearly for “willing and clean” companions—desirable young virgins like Moth. Moth also finds friendship with Dr. Sadie, a female physician struggling against the powerful forces of injustice, who teaches Moth to question and observe the world around her. The doctor hopes to protect Moth from falling prey to a terrible myth known as the “virgin cure”—the tragic belief that deflowering a “fresh maid” can cleanse the blood and heal men afflicted with syphilis—that has destroyed the lives of other Bowery girls. Ignored by society, unprotected by the law, Moth dreams of independence. But there’s a high price to pay for freedom, and no one knows that better than a girl from Chrystie Street.

4.Nova Scotia: Life Near Water by Diane Lynn McGyver . So you all know I’m a littl partial to the short story, having penned  few in my day.anthology01 Life Near Water is a collection of short stories that transports readers to locations across Nova Scotia and on a short vacation to the coastal waters of Newfoundland. McGyver’s love for the sea shines in The Ocean Between Them, and her keen interest in genealogy and history plays interesting rolls in The Man Who Reads Obituaries, Dancing in the Shine and War on His Shore. McGyver’s quick wit takes centre stage in Miss Tuttle’s Lemon Tarts where neighbours bond over a cup of tea. Mutated Blood Lines beams readers into the future to a time when high water levels transform Nova Scotia into an island. Nova Scotia – Life Near Water is McGyver’s first anthology. For information about where you can order this book click HERE

510MRkqaUiL._SL500_AA300_5. Kiss the Joy as it Flies by Sheree Fitch. Oh yes, this beloved children’s writer also writes for adults. Panic-stricken by the news that she needs exploratory surgery, forty-eight-year-old Mercy Beth Fanjoy drafts a monumental to-do list and sets about putting her messy life in order. But tidying up the edge of her life means the past comes rushing back to haunt her and the present keeps throwing up more to-dos. Between fits of weeping and laughter, ranting and bliss, Mercy must contemplate the meaning of life in the face of her own death. In a week filled with the riot of an entire life, nothing turns out the way she expected.

 

Again, I’ll ask for any suggestions you might have to add to my list. My hope is that these two posts will encourage you to check out these books and to think about supporting the local authors in your area. Many of us talk about “buying local” it’s only natural that it should apply to books!

Rug Hooker Extraordinaire

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The lampshades below were also hooked by Syr!

I’m always amazed at those people who have more than one exceptional talent. Maybe that’s because I don’t venture very far from writing myself, and I forget that many others do. While I’ve known author, Syr Ruus (Love Songs of Emmanuel Taggart) for several years now, I’ve only recently discovered her talent for rug hooking. Imagine my delight when I discovered that she was having a show of her hooked rugs!

Yesterday, we drove to Petite Reviere to attend Syr’s opening at the River House Gallery. We were totally amazed by Syr’s work. Here are a few snaps I took to share with my blog readers.

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Syr’s work will be on display at the River House Gallery during the month of April. If you get a chance , I suggest you drop in and take a look at the work from this local artist. There are many more rugs on display for your enjoyment. There are also copies of her book, “Love Songs of Emmanuel Taggart” for sale at the gallery if you’re interested in supporting a local author. You can check out Syr’s Facebook page as well to learn more about this talented writer/rug hooker.

Syr Ruus, Author

DSC03498  Congratulations, Syr, on the success of your rug hooking exhibition. We had a lovely time!

Time Stealers

Earlier this week I emailed writer friend, Syr Ruus, and asked her to send me some time. She didn’t.  Which didn’t really come as any big surprise. Yeah, it was just a joke, but I did think later it would be kind of neat if we could put in an order for time just like that. Time seems to be one of those things that are constantly in short supply. Or is it simply because we try to cram too much into our days?  Is it even logical to try and fill each  moment? Or do we all need a little down time?

We all lead busy lives and hardly does it seem there is time to just sit back and relax. When I get a few moments my nose is either stuck in a book or else I’m tapping away at the keyboard.

I have been limiting my Facebook time lately. While it’s fun, and I like keeping connected with my friends (Sorry, Sheila, I didn’t know about your trip until it was over  :) ) Facebook can be a time stealer. But not to blame Facebook alone, it takes an interested party to partake in Facebook games and constant status updates. I’m not saying that’s a bad thing for everyone, but for this writer it can mean the difference between winning at Luxulous or writing a novel. Sorry, I have to say; I’ll take the later.

Not to be down on Facebook. I like  Facebook. It’s a great way to connect with people we  wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity to, and  I do  believe this connection  with others is part of what gives our lives meaning. Without some human interaction I’m not sure there would even be a point to life.

I wonder if part of the reason we all seem to complain when it comes to time is that we’re too hard on ourselves, expecting that we’re super-human and can accomplish more than is reasonably expected. When we fail to meet our expectations, we chastise ourselves for coming up short. Some people make lists to keep themselves on track, which is a great idea, unless we add too many items to that list. I’ve said several times on this blog that I’m not a list-maker, but from time to time I’ll write down the things I want to accomplish in a day when there are many things that need my attention. But once I start I find it difficult to stop listing, and instead of setting down realistic goals I’ve added so stinking many items I’d have to stay up half the night to get it all done. When it comes to list-making I get a failing grade.

There’s really no point in blaming time for our shortcomings.  Time is a constant. It’s been there since, well, the beginning of time. There are 60 minutes in ever hour, 24 hours in every day—no more, no less. You’d think by now we’d get used to that and learn how to utilize our time in more productive way instead of  complaining about the lack of time in our lives.

 What  are the time stealers in your  life? Do you struggle to find the time to accomplish your goals? Do you ever worry about wasting time or are you happy with all that you accomplish in a day? Do you make time to just relax?

Who’s Going To Blurb My Book?

I haven’t mentioned yet that Atwood is going to blurb my next book. Squee!!!! That’s right, my publisher has asked and she’s agreed. Nothing elaborate, mind you, just short and sweet and to the point.

This is Best’s best work by far……Agnes Atwood

Admit it, you thought I meant Margaret Atwood, didn’t you? Trust me, if dreams had wings I would fly to the moon just to have Margaret Atwood blurb my next book. Unfortunately, for this author, it ain’t happening.

Okay, just to clear things up there is no Agnes Atwood (at least that I know of) and she sure as heck isn’t writing a blurb for my next book either…..Best’s best work… sheesh! Amateur time.

Don’t think of the things you read here as lies, think of them as fiction reflecting my dreams. One thing I’d like for all of you to understand is this, when you come here to visit you’re free to dream. And none of these measly little dreams. If you’re going to dream you might just as well dream big. It’s the only way to go!!

So I’ve been dreaming of blurbs.

Why a blurb? Well, why the heck not?

I’ve even exchanged a few emails back and forth with author pal, Syr Ruus, in which I accused her of using the word blurb more times in a blurb than was humanly possibly. It was all for fun, and I do like fun.

Truth is, I kind of thought the word “blurb” was newish but, after looking it up, I discovered it was first used in 1907.  While new fangled phrases, and fashions, often take time to trickle down to rural communities, the word blurb must be moving at a snail’s pace. Where the heck have I been for the past 104 years? Tell me you’re surprised to learn that the word is that old ‘cause I don’t want to be the only one who’s outdated.

I have given some time over to dreaming about book blurbs and the fact that I didn’t have one on my first book. Not just that, I’ve been dreaming of who I’d like to write one for my upcoming book.

Although it must be considered effective, I can say in all honestly that I’ve never purchased a book because of it. In fact, I seldom read them or pay any attention at all. I’m more interested in reading a short synopsis of the story. The cover and title influence me as well. But hey, this from someone who’s a 104 years slower than the rest of the world. I’m sure plenty of people read them and take what the author has to say into consideration. I’d truly love to have a certain someone write a teeny blurb for my book. , and while I do love Margaret Atwood, she’s not the person I have in mind. Since I believe that dreams do come true I shall wait to see where this dream will take me.

Are you influenced by author endorsements on books? Have you ever blurbed or been blurbed?

Time for you to dream…

If you could have anyone, dead or alive, blurb your book who would it be? Here’s your chance to write the blurb for your novel. Dream big–What have you got to lose? Show us what you come up with.

Cast Out the Writing Snob!

As writers, are we too quick to make the assumption that people who are non-writers simply don’t “get us”; that somehow they have absolutely no concept of what a writer’s life is about? We blog about it, maybe even whine about it, acting like the elite group we believe we’re a part of—-the poor misunderstood writer. I’m sometimes moved to wonder, does this line of thinking make us writing snobs?

Have you, dear writer, ever pondered the question: Do non-writers see this as snobbish behaviour on our part? Do non-writers look at us and wonder if we think we’re somehow better?–And do we? Be honest. Are we secretly a bit smug over the fact that were are writers/authors?

As writers, nothing pleases us more than to have another writer to talk to about our craft. That’s only natural. I’ve experienced this myself with my “gab sessions” with a few local author friends. When we get together, we always know the purpose for our meetings. We talk about our current Work in Progress (WIP), we discuss the various publishers we’ve submitted to, and what’s happening in the publishing industry, and then we whine. Yes, we sometimes commiserate, lament, grumble, and then vow to keep on going. And while all this is happening, it’s as if the rest of the world does not exist because no one understands what we writers go through except another writer. Right?

But perhaps we writers are simply kidding ourselves. Perhaps this thinking is only true on one level—the writing level, that is. Perhaps we don’t give non-writers enough credit. Perhaps they do understand part of our plight as writers, perhaps more than even they realise.

So let’s look at a few of the myths we writers tell ourselves about non-writers.

*Non-writers do not understand rejection:

Come on—-Who are we trying to kid? If you live in the world, interact with people on a regular basis and have never experience rejection than YOU’RE quite possibly in an elite group yourself. To be human is to experience rejection at one time or another, and in one form or another. It started out on the playground when we were in elementary. Maybe someone didn’t like us or didn’t want to play with us.  BUT…but.. a writing rejection is different, we writers might argue. Someone didn’t like the story I put my heart and soul into. It’s so, so personal. Well, what’s more personal than, Get away from me I don’t like you and I don’t want to play with you?  How’s that for personal? And just think, it’s said to a kid who doesn’t understand the meaning of the word rejection, let alone can figure out the reason for the rejection. Rejection is all around us, in one form or another. It is not specific only to writers. We writers need to face up to it.

*Non-writers do not understand the long wait times we writers must endure:

Really? Do we really believe that non-writers have never had to wait an excruciating long time for anything? Wow! Aren’t they special? Life is also about waiting. We wait for appointments, wait in line, we wait for a lucky break, we wait in traffic, we wait for months to hear the results of some test, we wait for our ship to come in, we wait, and wait and then wait some more…I could go on. Everyone must wait unless you have a magical lamp or a genie to grant you your every command. If you do happen to have one of those, please send me a private message, would ya? I’d be interested in hearing all about it.

*But…. we writers have a special talent:

Hello, I see many talented people around me every day. Perhaps they don’t exhibit their talent through words, but the written word is not the only way to exhibit our talents. I have friends who are musicians, crafters, artists, scrap-bookers, card-makers, gardeners, cooks, who have just as much talent, or even more, than I. My talent is no more *special* than the next person’s; my talent just happens to be writing. Being a writer is not the epitome of talent in this world. It’s just one form.

*Non-writers do not have to constantly provide the self-motivation/self discipline to get things done.

Well, that’s just silly. We all need to be our own cheering section from time to time. If we didn’t exhibit some kind of self-motivation we’d spend our days doing absolutely nothing. We’d be zombies, mindless creatures going through the motions. Maybe we’d sit and stare out the window all day. Sure it takes motivation and discipline to be a writer, but that is true for any job we undertake, especially when it is something we have to do all on our own with help from no one. Nobody can do the studying for that English exam that’s coming up but you, and I don’t know anyone who’s going to arrive at my house with a mop and broom just to help me with my housework. What will make you finish that new scarf you’re working on, or get that Christmas baking done, if you possess no motivation or self-discipline. And if you want to change jobs because you’re under-appreciated and over-worked? You got it! Motivation and discipline, is what keeps us sending out resumes in search of that perfect job.

*Non-writers do not really care about what we are writing:

I have several people in my life, non-writers that they are, who ask me what I’m working on. Sometimes, if they see something they think I might be interested in they bring it to my attention, because you just never know what might end up as fiction one day. When a writer is coming to the area to speak or sign books, some of my friends will mention it. While a non-writer might not be interested in the research I’m doing, or even how many times I’ve revised a story, they are usually anxious to hear what’s new on the publishing horizon for me. “Are you writing another book?” I get asked that one a lot. Non-writers do care. Why wouldn’t they? We are all human, all with the ability to empathize with one another, to hope for one another, and to share in our joys and triumphant.

As a writer, I’m attempting to stop thinking in terms that separates the non-writers from the writers in my life. Instead, I am willing to think in terms of what connects us together as people, what parts of our lives that we universally share. We have far more similarities than we do differences. I’m attempting to stop thinking like a writing snob and start thinking like an ordinary person who just happens to write. This does not mean that I will stop enjoying my “gab-sessions” with my writer friends, or the wonderful connections I’ve made with writers in the blogging community. It will simply make me more mindful of all the areas that my non-writing friends can relate.

Do you agree that we writers can sometimes exhibit a bit of an attitude when it comes to the non-writing population because we believe ourselves to be misunderstood by them? If you consider yourself a non-writer have you ever felt a bit inferior while in the company of a writer? 

I Heard the Word, and it was on the Street

Word on the Street was held on the Halifax waterfront this year. It’s the annual celebration of book and magazine publishers, authors, anything to do with the written word. Two years ago I read from my manuscript as my book wasn ‘t yet back from the printers. This year I went to be part of the audience, brought along my camera and enjoyed the day as a spectator. Okay, so I hung out around the young adult stage for much of the time we were there. It only seemed natural. Plus, I was hoping to get some photos with some of my favourite YA authors.  I’m putting together a scrapbook, one that I hope Miss Charlotte will adore when she is old enough to be reading these authors for herself. Hopefully, she’ll be impressed to see that her Nanny Bee actually met these incredible authors for real.

We arrived in time to hear Jan Coates read from, “A Hare in the Elephant’s Trunk.”  I’m not sure why I didn’t make Jan pose for a picture with me. Maybe it was because she was in a hurry to get over to the Woozles booth to sign books. As many times as what Jan and I have had coffee together it makes me wonder why there isn’t one single shot of the two of us together. Why is that Jan?

 

 

 

We checked out the various publishers who were set up. Got a few pictures of the books on Nimbus Publishing’s table.

Look, there’s JoAnn Yhard’s books Lost on Brier Island and The Fossil Hunter of Sydney Mines. Sorry that I missed JoAnn’s reading, I blame the chauffeur, although I can’t complain because he does a darn good job of driving the old folks around the city. Thanks, Matt!  Not to worry, we took him to have his photo snapped with Theodore Tugboat. It was all good.

When I asked for a photo with Sheree Fitch, she pulled out her glasses from her big Mary Poppin-sized bag and asked me to put them on. Well, you don’t say no to Sheree Fitch.

What do you think? Do I look any taller in these?  Hmmm, I’m kind of wondering now what all she keeps in that purple bag of hers.

So listen up, I learned a valuable lesson while talking to Sheree yesterday. Never, ever tell an author, such as Sheree Fitch, that you loved her book. You’ll be sure to get a somewhat polite but confused response when they ask you “which book?”  Duh! Like Sheree’s been published a gazillion times and I have read a number of her books, but I don’t think she’s yet mastered mind reading. Always remember to mention what book you’re talking about. It just makes it  SO much easer for the author.

We listened while Sheree, Jill MacLean ad Don Aker read from their books and answered the audience’s questions.

I chatted with Jill MacLean later. I met Jill last year at at the book launch for author Cynthia D’entrement’s book  Unlocked . Jill even wrote me a lovely note  last year to congratulate me on Bitter, Sweet’s nomination for the Bilson Award. So it’s obvious that I could have used Sheree’s glasses this time too., or would you believe I was sitting down for this shot?

 

 

 

I was excited to meet Valeria Sherrard. Valerie’s latest book, The Glory Wind, won the Ann Conner Brimer award this year. Yay Valerie!  I’m SO looking forward to reading it. It was remarkable to watch as Valerie answered questions from young readers. Seems to me, those young readers had some well thought out questions. Glad it was Valerie on the hot-seat and not me.

I ran into Syr Ruus yesterday as well. She was off to sign copies of her book, Lovesongs of Emmanuel Taggart. Okay, so Syr scrunched down a bit for this photo to make me appear a bit taller. How’s that for friendship, I ask?

Before heading back out of the big city, we listened to Steve Vernon read from his YA novel, Sinking Deeper.        Having already read the book, I knew what to expect. My son did not. I do believe by some of the chuckles he quite enjoyed Steve’s sense of humour, and his lively writing which comes out quite nicely in this book.  Steve’s a great story-teller and very entertaining. A real pro.                                                                                                                                                                                

So, I think I covered just about everything. Of course, there is so much more to Word on the Street than what I covered, but I can’t be in every place at once . If you have never gone it’s well worth going to. We have some truly remarkable and talented authors in our area.

The Gift of Syr Wisdom

Although I’m not altogether sure, I’m willing to bet that one of the greatest gifts a writer can give or receive is the gift of words.

No one likes receiving books as a gift any more than me. The thought of all those words and sentences makes me tingle all over. As I make my way through the chapters hopefully that one gift changes into many gifts as I languish over the sentences and paragraphs, that deliciously wonderful plot that keeps me reading onward.

Last week a gift arrived for me in my inbox from writer friend, Syr Ruus author of LoveSongs Of Emmanuel Taggart.

Her email consisted of some writerly advise and a bit of insight prompted by one of my earlier blog posts. If she was my mom I think she would have simply told me to smartened the heck up and just write. But she’s not my mom, and she would never say something of that nature. She’s a friend who has the weapon of words at her disposal, and so she wrote, rather eloquently I thought. With her permission I wanted to share with you all this one sentence that I absolutely loved:

“Creation, I believe, comes from that part of your being where rules do not exist.”

——Syr Ruus

When I read those words it was as if a tremendous weight had been removed, it reaffirmed what my heart had been telling me all along.

I always enjoy Syr’s emails for they usually offer some words of wisdom, loads of praise and encouragement, and always brimming with the delightful wit that I have come to expect in one of Syr’s emails.

So thank you, Syr, for your wonderfully wise words that meant more to this writer/friend than you could know, thank you for helping to pull me out of my writing woes without telling me to smarten the heck up even though I needed a little smartening up.

Syr Wisdom—I kind of like the sound of that!

House On Mosher’s Island

Thought I’d post this picture courtesy of Syr Ruus.

Awhile back I was told by the good people at Sagors Bookstore in Bridgewater that several people had identified the mystery house on the cover of my book as being a house out on Mosher’s Island off Nova Scotia’s south shore. Naturally, I’ve been curious about it, knowing that I’d likely never get a chance to check it out for myself.        Thanks Syr!

At the book launch someone asked about the house on the cover and my editor, Caitlin, said it was one they had on file and she didn’t know where it had been taken.

Now someone I know made mention that they thought it was a house that would have been in the community back in the 40”s but of course we know that’s impossible. Right?

Okay, there are some obvious differences between the house in the photo and the one on my book, but then we all know what can be done with graphic design today. So this one’s for you to decide.

Is it the same house? Or it is just someone’s over eager imagination?

Busy, busy, busy

Yesterday was crammed full of activity. The day started with a quick trip to the Ross Farm to watch the re-enactment of The New Ross Freighters taking a load of lumber and barrels to Chester Basin.

It might have been nice had I thought to charge my camera battery the night before. But I did get in a few shots. But there are plenty of photos on the Ross Farm Museum facebook page Just follow the link if you want to take a peek.

Here’s a link to the Ross Farm Museum’s facebook page filled with photos.

I also had a nice luncheon with Syr Ruus at the Wildwood Café on King Street. Great food, and great conversation. We both had a bit to celebrate with Bitter, Sweet`s nomination for the Bilson Award and Syr recently found out that her book, Lovesongs of Emmanuel Taggart, has made the long list for the ReLit Awards. Congrats, Syr! I`m keeping my fingers crossed for both of us.

You can now find Syr on facebook if you want to joing her fan page.

to keep up on her news.

In the evening it was off to an anniversary party for good friends of ours. More great food, music by the Joyce Seamone band (local) and lots of laughs.

Busy, busy, busy. This morning we`re off to a church service at Christ Church in New Ross which is being followed by a potluck.

Was there ever any doubt that food would be involved again?

I still have to squeeze in some writing time as I’ve just recently realized that I need to write a whole new chapter. See what can happen during the revision process? Not sure why I didn`t see it before, but believe me, writers learn not to question these things but simply do them.

How is your weekend going?

Meanwhile @ the Lunenburg Library

I had a great time reading at Library in Lunenburg today. I was excited to see an announcement about my reading on the library door when I arrived.

Doesn’t take much to make me happy.

Okay, so Margaret Atwood didn’t show up. I know, I know, maybe I should have tweeted her earlier in week, reminder her that I came to the Pearl Theatre when she was in Lunenburg, and was one of the few people who actually had a copy of “The Tent” that evening since there was a mix-up with the publisher and the books hadn’t arrived. She’s a busy lady; I figured I’d have to jog her memory. I’m pretty sure she’d have been there if only she had known. After all, I’m one of her “T-Pals.” Don’t I deserve some perks?

Maybe as she reads this post, she’ll drop a comment. I can always hope, right?

In a relaxed atmosphere, I read from my book. After the reading, we chatted about the book and I answered questions. See Margaret, you missed your chance. I would have answered any question you asked.

But look who did showed up. It was Syr Ruus, author of Love Songs Of Immanuel Taggart. Have I mentioned I love that book?

Okay, so my husband bribed her with a free bookmark if she’d hold up a copy of my book for a photo. Amazing what people will do for a bookmark. Isn’t it?  It’s a good thing Syr is so good-natured.

So that was my afternoon. Lunenburg is one of Nova Scotia’s most historical and, might I add, beautiful seaside towns.

I’m already planning my next trip.

I’ll catch you next time, Margaret.

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