The Answer to Your Question

In the two and half years since Flying with a Broken Wing was published I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked, “When’s the sequel coming?” To be honest, some of you have been relentless in you pursuit of an answer, even trying to trick me into telling. (Smile because you know who you are!)

Many of you would agree with me when I say I’ve been a bit annoying vague about it all, dodging the question as best I could, not even willing to let you know how the writing was coming along. I’m not a fast writer. Or perhaps it’s more accurate to say I’m not a writer who gets to the end as often as I’d like. I typically have several projects on the go. That was the case when I started writing the sequel to Flying with a Broken Wing.

And then I started another novel.

And then I went back to one I’d started right after Bitter, Sweet was published.

I went back to the sequel again…

You get the idea?

Things went along slowly.

Then I lied. Well, maybe not an out and out lie. Let’s say I withheld certain information from y’all. (Did I just say y’all?) Seriously, writing a story doesn’t necessarily mean that story will see publication. I mean what if the publisher hated it? What if it just wasn’t what they wanted? Doubt sets in.

But now all that doubt is gone. I’m here to confess that the sequel has been finished for some time now. Yay! Do you forgive me for leading you astray? Hope so.

BUT WAIT….

There’s more.

I just signed a contract with Nimbus Publishing for the sequel to “Flying with a Broken Wing.” Yup…signed …sealed and delivered. And I’ve been dying to tell y’all.

For now, the title of the book is “Cammie Takes Flight,” but as I’ve explained before this could end up being changed. I’ll be sure to let you know if that happens.

So, do you think I’m excited at all? You betcha. I can hardly wait!

Speaking of waiting, I assume y’alls next question will when when’s it going to be published?

Well, my sources are saying Spring 2017. That’s just around the corner in the book publishing industry.

So, there you have it. The answer to the question you’ve been asking me for years now. And well, me, I’m just walking around with my head in the clouds.

And if all that isn’t enough Darlene Foster , author of the Amanda Series, posted a lovely review of Flying With a Broken Wing posted on the Children Writer’s Guild. You can read it here. Again, thank you Darlene for your generosity!

 

 

Local Books For Your Winter Reading Pleasure

From time to time I like to give a shout out to some authors and their books. It’s been awhile. Actually, longer than I thought once I got looking back on old posts. Since I do like local (as many of you know) this shout out is for some local books that have recently come onto my radar. I wanted to mention books that I hadn’t previously mentioned on my blog, books that are new to me! From picture books to novels, I really don’t care. A book is a book no matter what age you are. I hope you’ll check some of these books out this winter when you’re curled up by the fire on a cold blustery night.

Explosion Newsie by Jacqueline Halsey.

imagesOn December 6, 1917, two ships collided in the busy wartime harbour of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The resulting explosion was the biggest man-made blast prior to the development of nuclear weapons. It flattened one fifth of the city. Thousands of people were killed that day and thousands more injured or made homeless. One lucky survivor, ten-year-old newsie Macky, has a key job to do — get the news out.

The beautiful and compelling illustrations in this book help tell the story of what it was like to be a working child of ten in the city that day. Macky, an unreliable and fun-loving boy, has to deliver the news to a confused and wrecked city where the only way to know what happened to missing loved ones was to read the local newspaper.

Red Coat Brigade by Vernon Oickleimages (1)

On a warm, beautiful sunny day in June 1782, the women and young children of the village of Chester come together to defend their still-fledgling settlement against the invading and much more well-armed Americans. Armed only with their cunning and imagination, this rag-tag group of settlers pushed back the marauding intruders without the loss of a single life. In this fictional account of those events, veteran author Vernon Oickle weaves facts and legend to tell a story that has become part of Nova Scotia’s heritage and folklore.

 

These Good Hands by Carol Bruneau

downloadSet in the early autumn of 1943, the These Good Hands interweaves the biography of French sculptor Camille Claudel and the story of the nurse who cares for her during the final days of her thirty-year incarceration in France’s Montdevergues Asylum. Biographers have suggested that Claudel survived her long internment by writing letters, few of which left the asylum because of her strict sequestration; in Bruneau’s novel, these letters are reimagined in a series, penned to her younger self, the sculptor, popularly known as Rodin’s tragic mistress. They trace the trajectory of her career in Belle Époque Paris and her descent into the stigmatizing illness that destroyed it. The nurse’s story is revealed in her journal, which describes her labours and the ethical dilemma she eventually confronts. Through her letters, Camille relives the limits of her perseverance, and through her journal, Nurse confronts the limits of hers; these limits include the faith these women have in themselves, in the then-current advances in psychiatric medicine, and in a God whose existence is challenged by the war raging outside the enclosed world of the asylum. In her dying days, Camille teaches the nurse lessons in compassion and, ultimately, in what it means to endure.

Lonely Angels by Heather D. Veinotte

As a medium, Kelsey Gordon has had to deal with people’s distain of her gifts for most of her life. 51RqiF2VF7L._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_Through her firm, “Gordon’s Agency” she’s been hired by the Mayor’s Task Force of the city of Bridgeview to help find three little girls that have vanished without a trace. As soon as she’s introduced to the very handsome Lieutenant Jake Carson, she feels his contempt for what she stands for and realizes that this assignment will not be an easy one. The murderer must be found, but she knows if she and Jake work together, her heart will be lost to a man who detests what she is. Lieutenant Jake Carson is stunned to learn that his uncle has hired a medium to work on the task force when he knew what his nephew thought of so called psychics. Anyone who declares that they have psychic powers are the lowest life form on the planet, but Jake has no choice but to work with her. To make matters worse, he can’t keep his eyes off of this beautiful, but phony Kelsey Gordon. Time is running out. Kelsey’s life is threatened by the murderer and to complicate the situation they’re fighting the sexual cord that’s pulling them closer.

Random Acts By Valerie Sherrard

download (1)In the haze of a food-induced stupor, Zoey Dalton and her best friends Bean and Jenna make a pledge to begin performing random acts of kindness—anonymously. Their previous track record for altruism is pretty much a flat line, so anything they do to help others is bound to be an improvement.

Or is it?

What if the random acts of kindness are unwanted and misunderstood? What if, instead of spreading joy and good will, the trio’s actions stir up trouble, wreak havoc and maybe even cause bodily harm? That, of course, would be a different story.

This story, in fact.

Scotia Sinker by Alison Delory

download (2)Cameron and Erin take a new adventure in their cardboard box — this time, to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean! In Lunar Lifter, the first story in their adventure-packed series, they used magic markers to transform their box into a spaceship that took them to the moon. Now, when they find their damaged Lunar Lifter on the beach, they use their remaining pens to repair and transform it into a small submarine called Scotia Sinker. Their new adventure pulls them far from home, deep into the ocean’s wild waters where many thrills and threats await. Here, Cameron and Erin need all their bravery, wits and the help of some interesting aquatic friends to outrun a fearsome predator.

 

Just Beneath My Skin by Darren Greer

download (3)In the small town of North River, every day that goes by bleeds into the next. Poverty begets hopelessness, hopelessness breeds violence, violence causes despair. The only way to change fate, a minister tells his son, is to leave. The minister’s son, Jake MacNeil, chooses to ignore his father’s advice. Only when he realizes what has become of his life – working a grueling dead-end job, living with a drunk, friends with a murderer – does he decide to make something of himself. But nothing comes without a cost: in choosing freedom, Jake abandons his own son, Nathan, to the care of the boy’s abusive mother. Years later, a reformed Jake comes back for Nathan, to finally set things right. But in North River, everything comes around again; and when a dangerous figure from the past becomes hell-bent on dragging the new Jake “back down where he belongs”, three generations of MacNeil men must come together to pay the full price of hope. Gritty, unrelenting, yet peppered with Darren Greer’s trademark mix of wit and poignance, Just Beneath My Skin is the work of an author at the height of his game.

Grist by Linda Little

download (4)“This is the story of how you were loved,” Penelope MacLaughlin whispers to her granddaughter. Penelope MacLaughlin marries a miller and gradually discovers he is not as she imagined. Nonetheless she remains determined to make the best of life at the lonely mill up the Gunn Brook as she struggles to build a home around her husband’s eccentricities. His increasing absence leaves Penelope to run the mill herself, providing her with a living but also destroying the people she loves most. Penelope struggles with loss and isolation, and suffers the gradual erosion of her sense of self. A series of betrayals leaves her with nothing but the mill and her determination to save her grandchildren from their disturbed father. While she can prepare her grandsons for independence, her granddaughter is too young and so receives the greater gift: the story that made them all.

Somewhere I Belong by Glenna Jenkins

download (5)In Somewhere I Belong, we meet young P.J. Kavanaugh at North Boston Station. His father has died, the Depression is on, and his mother is moving them back home. They settle in, and P.J. makes new friends. But the P.E.I. winter is harsh, the farm chores endless, and his teacher a drunken bully. He soon wants to go home; the problem is how.

A letter arrives from Aunt Mayme announcing a Babe Ruth charity baseball game in the old neighbourhood. But Ma won’t let him go. P.J is devastated. The weeks pass, then there is an accident on the farm. P.J. becomes a hero and Ma changes her mind. He travels to Boston, sees his friends, watches Babe Ruth hit a home run, and renews his attachment to the place. But his eagerness to return to the Island makes him wonder where he really belongs.

Amazing Grace by Lesley Crewe

download (6)Can you really move forward without putting the past to rest?

Grace Willingdon has everything she needs. For fifteen years she’s lived in a trailer overlooking Bras d’Or Lakes in postcard-perfect Baddeck, Cape Breton, with Fletcher Parsons, a giant teddy bear who’s not even her husband. But Grace’s blissful life is rudely interrupted when her estranged son calls from New York City, worried about his teenaged daughter.

Before she knows it, Grace finds herself the temporary guardian of her self-absorbed, city-slicker granddaughter, Melissa. Trapped between a past she’s been struggling to resolve and a present that keeps her on her toes, Grace decides to finally tell her story. Either the truth will absolve her, or cost her everything.

Crackling with Lesley Crewe’s celebrated wit and humour, Amazing Grace is a heartfelt tale of enduring love and forgiveness, and the deep roots of family.

Hopefully, you’ll get the chance to take some of these books out for a test drive this winter. You might be amazed at how much local talent we have here in the Maritimes. Keep warm and Happy Reading! If you’d like to give a shout out to a local book in the comment section please do. I love promoting local. 

Twelve Lessons From 2015

For my first post in the New Year I thought I’d share with you some of the things I learned in the past year.

I firmly believe that life is all about the lessons. (I’ve said that before on my blog.) Some of them come easy, some not so easy, but like it or not, they still come. And thank goodness they do. 2015 wasn’t what I’d call a spectacular year, but there were some very precious moments sprinkled along the way. Lessons were learned (or sometimes came a second or third round as lessons often tend to do.) All we can do is deal with what’s presented to us and be thankful that we have a lifetime to try and figure it all out.

So here are twelve of the lessons that came my way last year. One for each month. Hopefully, there is something here that you can identify with.

1. The story isn’t finished simply because you think it is. Last year I finished the same novel about three times. This year, I hope to finish it only once. *Note I said hope.

2. Insensitive people don’t intentionally do hurtful things. In fact, they usually don’t take the feelings of others into consideration at all. What’s more, that’s unlikely to change anytime soon. Either accept them for who they are or give up being their friend. They probably won’t notice either way.

3. The only thing better than the birth of a new grandchild is the birth of two. I mean, why settle for one when you can have two I always say?

4. Not everyone will appreciate the things you do for them—true story. I’m not complaining, just stating facts. If you can’t do something for others simply out of the goodness of your heart don’t bother. Expecting praise for the things you do only puts a price tag on your good deed. Try doing something anonymously for a change. That’s when you truly know you’re not just looking for praise for those kind deeds of yours.

5. A good book will teach you a lot about the person you are. If you don’t think that’s true, join a book club, open yourself up to discussing topics you’ve never discussed before. Find out what your thoughts are on various issues, how they make you feel, what your thoughts and ideas say about you as a person. You might be surprised or even amazed!

6. Some people you just won’t like in life and they won’t like you. Believe me, it’s not the end of the world. For years, I was unwilling to admit when I didn’t like someone. These days I’m more honest with myself. We can’t possibly like everyone we meet. But so what? There are plenty of people out there to like, people who bring a smile to your face or a warm feeling in your heart. Cherish them.

7. You can’t be everything to everyone. Seriously, take care of yourself. Fill your own cup first. Fill the cup for others with what’s left over. That’s not being selfish it’s being realistic. There’s only so much one person can do and do well.

8. Even a new computer won’t make dial-up any faster. Rural Nova Scotia—what more can I say?

9. The email comes when you least expect it. Funny how we can spend time waiting on things, hoping for things, and then right after we give up on it, poof , something totally unexpected arrives, maybe even better than what we’d hoped and planned for. I had a few wonderful surprises this year that totally came out of left field. (In fact, as I write this, I just received one such email…Blows my mind…go figure!)

10. We are given just so many days in this life. Use them wisely. 2015 saw the loss of some people in my life who were far too young to leave us, but instead of spending our days mourning their loss we should honour their lives with the happy memories we shared with them. Sometimes this is easier said than done.

11. There are far too many books on the planet and you can only read so many. Sad but true. Each year my TBR pile seems to grow. Too many good books, people. Too many good books!

12. Sometimes you just need to let go. That’s a difficult one. Letting go of the things we have no control over takes some doing, especially when we allow that “thing” the power to tie us in knots. Letting go gives us freedom and peace, but it often takes time for us to come to that place.

So there you have it; some of the lessons I learned in 2015. Of course there were many more than the twelve I’ve listed and no doubt many more that I failed to recognize as being lessons at the time.

I hope 2016 is a memorable year for you, a time for you to grow and learn and come to appreciate the lessons that come your way.

Did you learn any great lesson in 2015 that you’d like to share?

The Memory Tree

Every year there is a lot of emphasis put on decorating the Christmas tree. Some people even have multiple trees because one simply isn’t enough. Colour schemes are selected, decorations chosen with care…Everything must match. It needs to be perfect.

And while that’s all nice, it certainly isn’t me. The decorations on my tree might seem a little simplistic to some but, for me, they create a tree full of memories every year.

I always loved the ornaments the kids made at school and how proud they were to hang them on the tree. Here are a few that seem to make it onto the tree every year.DSC06873

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I saw this blue jay one Christmas and picked it up for my next-door neighbour because she loved blue jays. When you squeeze it it sounds just like one. After she passed, at the age of 100, her daughter gave it back to me as a remembrance of her. This ornament reminds me of the time I spent with her and the Christmases I helped decorate her tree.

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This Christmas tree owl my daughter made the year Miss Charlotte was born. It came with a poem—a story about a little night owl named Charlotte who didn’t like sleeping at night. I’m happy to report that she did outgrow that night owl stage.

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I posted this one on Facebook a few days ago. It was made from Miss Charlotte’s hand print the year she was two.

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This is a painted bulb of our house more than ten years  ago. Some subtle changes dates this one for me.

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Aunt Elsie made a few ornaments that adorn our tree every year. This one she made my daughter and it doubled as a tag on her gift that year. That has to have been nearly 30 years and dear Aunt Elsie is no longer with us.

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Here’s a silly one my daughter made last year. It brought plenty of laughter on Christmas day. I posted this one on Facebook, too. Cracks me up!

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My son’s Baby’s First Christmas ornament. This year he has two babies celebrating their first Christmas. Exciting times!

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I have a few of these birds that I always put on my tree. We had the same kind on our tree when I was a kid and I loved them. I bought these in 1979 the year we got married.

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Over the years a few friends have tole painted ornaments for me. Can’t help but think of them, the fun we’ve had over the years, as I hang them on the tree.

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So there are a few memories from my Christmas tree. While my tree is not fancy and will never make the cover of a magazine it warms my heart every year.  I couldn’t imagine not finding a spot to hang these ornaments among the branches. And really, isn’t that what Christmas is all about, the memories, the love and laughter?

Wishing you all a Christmas filled with much love and warm memories, and may 2016 surpass your expectations and dreams.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

The Scoop

I’d like to announce that I just signed a big fat publishing contract, and while I’d like to announce that… it just ain’t the case.  Sorry to disappoint.

So here’s the scoop…Which isn’t actually “the scoop.” My use of social media presence has been a bit on the skimpy side for much of the fall, checking in occasionally on Facebook to drop a comment or post a photo or two. My poor blog likely thinks I’ve abandoned it. But nope, here I am.

Fall is always my busy time. Things get away from me. I’ve stop trying to stay on top of everything. I’m only me, after all. Working six days a week when Fall comes doesn’t give me much wiggle room. I wasn’t able to write everyday. And I had to simply say “no” to a few things and not worry if people didn’t understand. It has taken me a long time to know my limits. Even now I sometimes struggle with the word “no.” Not only that, my world has expanded to include grandchildren so we need to make a special effort to spend time with them. (The kiddies grow too quickly.) Even then, we didn’t get to see them as often as we’d have liked because of work and other obligations.

Saturday, Jan Coates and I shared a table at the New Ross Christmas Tree Festival craft fair. We had a great time. It was so nice to see so many people out supporting local crafters. I think Jan would likely agree with me about this one lady who turned out to be my favourite customer. She happened by our table just as Jan and I was enjoying a homemade cookie and coffee. She bought a book from each of us, but was so impressed that we were authors she chimed, “I can’t believe you’re both published authors and you’re just sitting there eating a cookie like it’s nothing.” Yup…that we were. That was just a highlight to the day, although there were many other people who happened by who were quite delightful, as well. So nice to have that kind of support from the community, and nice just to see a friendly smile or have someone stop and chat even if they already have your book or are not planning to purchase one that day. It’s more about meeting the public and enjoying the day. If book sales happen that comes as an added bonus.

Christmas is coming. No need to panic…Deep breath. Some how things will all get done as I mentioned recently on my Facebook status. I know it. The tree is in the stand—not yet decorated, but that’s okay. Maybe on the weekend if we get time. I’m in no hurry for that and can remember a Christmas, not too many years ago, when the tree wasn’t decorated until Christmas Eve. Lots of shopping left to do but that will get done as well. I made fruitcakes a few days ago. (No one eats or wants fruitcake. It’s just something I’ve always done.)

This year, Levi had fun picking out the family tree. ;)

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12295427_585814727079_1086416405704928326_nThe Lilly and Lleyton are now three months old, smiling and laughing. What precious a thing it is to see them developing their own personalities.

 

Miss Charlotte brought home her first report card and has even experienced her first snow day of the season in New Brunswick. She’s anxious to come for a visit during the holidays and hasn’t yet met new baby cousins.

12348423_10153274457043951_1571437249_nHere in Nova Scotia it doesn’t look the least bit like Christmas, if you’re used to a white Christmas, that is. All that could change very quickly, and the weather forecast is calling for some snow on Tuesday. We shall see. Of course that doesn’t necessarily mean we’ll be in for a white Christmas. The temperatures have been fluctuating most of the fall.

So there it is, the scoop… sort of. Am I doing any writing? Sure am. While I struggled many day this fall to make the time, I’m actually working on a few projects. I have a piece coming up in another anthology next year and lots of ideas brewing.

So, what’s your scoop or non-scoop? I’ve missed you all these past few weeks.

The Power of Three

You know how they say that good things come in threes, well it was certainly true for me last week. Three new books in as many days, three totally delightful books that I just have to tell you about. Am I lucky or what?

1.The first book came via Joss Burnel, a poet/blogger I met through WordPress a few years backDSC06655 when she showed up at a craft fair in the Annapolis Valley to meet me with a copy of her book of poetry, If God Was a Woman. I’m truly looking forward to reading this as I’m sure Joss (the Crowing Crone) has many insights to share. She has such a warm, friendly spirit I believe we could have talked all afternoon and not run out of words to say. What a thrill to meet a blogging buddy. I might be a little partial, as well, since Joss gave my book, Flying With a Broken Wing, a ringing endorsement in her review a few years back. You can check it out  HERE if you missed it. When I said she was a warm friendly spirit I certainly meant it!

2.From the Heart is an anthology that I’m a part of. It is the third anthology in the Inspiring Hope series. As with the other two books, Inspiring Hope: One story at a Time, and Fly Like an Eagle, the proceeds from this book will also go to charity. Profits from this latest book compiled by Gary Doi will go to the Cmolik Foundation. The foundation “supports post-secondary scholarships for high school graduates who are financially challenged and have demonstrated character, good work ethic and persistence in achieving their goals.” How about that! The books are available for order through Amazon just follow the link here I like knowing the profits will go to charity!

3. And last but not least, I was totally excited when an unexpected package from Diane Tibert came in the mail. The book is titled Throw Away Kitten and was penned by Candy McMudd. a.ka. Diane Tibert. As I told Diane over email, this book is my new favourite and not only because I’m mentioned on page 42 (yes, I’m totally serious. She mentioned me in the book. Cool or what!))  It’s a story for kids 6-11 and I can hardly wait to share this with Miss Charlotte. But I’ll keep the surprise of her nanny’s name being mentioned in the book until she finds it herself. I wonder what her reaction will be. You can order Diane’s book here. 

I hope you’ll check out some or all of these books. I tend to think they’re all pretty special, after all, they have the power of three behind them!

 

Interview With Daphne Greer

photoToday, it is my pleasure to welcome author Daphne Greer to my blog. Daphne’s here to talk about her latest novel, Jacob’s Landing, which was published by Nimbus Publishing this past spring. Daphne says that never in a million years did she ever picture herself being a writer. She admits that she was not a good student in school and couldn’t spell. She spent her summers working at camps, with children always being the center of her attention.  She eventually  made her way to University and graduated with a Bachelor of Child Studies from Mount St Vincent University. Daphne is the author of Maxed Out (An American Library Association Nominee for best quick read) and her latest book,  Jacob’s Landing,  a Silver Birch Nominee.  She lives in Newport Landing with her husband and four daughters.

About Jacob’s Landing : Coping with the recent death of his father, twelve-year-old Jacob Mosher is !cid_7288C98B-A0D0-4073-A8F3-A908F0874800@Nimbussent to spend the summer with his aging, estranged (and strange!) grandparents in rural Newport Landing, Nova Scotia. Reluctantly, he trades the security of his foster mum in “Upper Canada” for a blind grandfather, Frank, who dresses like a sea captain and conducts flag-raising ceremonies, and a quirky grandmother, Pearl, who sometimes forgets her dentures and has Jacob running in circles. Jacob has two short months to figure out how to deal with his ailing grandfather, the surging Avon River tides, and the family secret that’s haunting his newfound grandparents. He didn’t expect so much danger and mystery to be lurking in tiny Newport Landing.

1.Can you tell us a little about your writing career, how and when the writing bug bit you?

14 years ago I pretty much stumbled into writing. My cousin’s son was struggling with his older brother with special needs and I was trying to figure out how I could be helpful. I initially went looking for a picture book that might help him understand his brother better. When I wasn’t successful I decided to write him a picture book myself. I called it, ‘The Boy Who Smiled.’ At the time I was working full time managing group homes for adults with special needs. I was also a busy mom of three girls until I became pregnant with our fourth daughter and landed in the hospital on bed rest for three months. To fill the time I started writing picture books. Fast forward to deciding to be a stay at home mother. I decided that writing would be my second career. Little did I know how difficult that would be. I quickly realized that I had to learn the craft of writing – loving to write was not enough. So, I joined the Writers Federation of Nova Scotia and trotted off to my very first class with Noreen Smiley with my little picture book in hand, where it quickly morphed into a chapter book and took on a whole new life. Many moons later it was published with the title, Maxed Out, as a quick read geared towards reluctant readers. I also wrote a short story called, Christmas Dinner at Wallace Point, which appeared in A Maritime Christmas (which is when I first met the lovely Laura Best, as we both had stories published in the collection.)My writing has lead me to be involved with Writers in the Schools where I give presentations to school age children – hopefully inspiring them to believe anything is possible.

2. You recently had a new novel published can you tell us a bit about it and where the inspiration for this novel came from?

I love stories about families and how they overcome hardship. Bits of stories that I might be privy too or hear about linger in my brain and slosh about until something perks my interest. In this case my Dad suggested I write about Newport Landing and the rich history of the area where we live. At the time I was working with elderly people so they were front and center in my mind. One morning I woke up early and pictured a young boy sitting across from his grandmother who he’s never met and all he can concentrate on is the fact that her false teeth keep slipping out of place. Jacob and Pearl were born and the story unfolded on its own. To my delight I was able to sneak some historical facts about my community into the story.

3. Your latest novel is set in Newport Landing. Why did you chose this location?

Newport Landing lends itself to a story as the scenery is breath taking. The area is rich with history and my husband and I have raised our four daughters here. It just felt right for the story.

4. How did you choose the title for Jacob’s Landing? And can you tell us a bit about the cover?

The title describes the main character who goes to stay with his estranged grandparents for the summer, where he ultimately lands on his feet. My writing group was instrumental with the title. I took the photo at the Avon River Heritage Museum near our home. In the story a telescope figures prominently. I had wanted to take the photo from the widows walk from one of the mansions across the street from my house, but it has seen better days and isn’t safe. The boy featured on the cover is Oliver Mitson a neighborhood boy who was the same age as Jacob in the story. Nimbus did a fantastic job with the cover. The compass is a neat symbol that represents Jacob finding family.

5. Jacob’s grandparents are both colourful characters. Did the inspiration for these characters come from real life?

I never really know my characters until they appear on the page, but at the time I was surrounded by many different colorful elderly people whom I’m sure made their way onto the pages of Jacob’s Landing in various ways, but no one character is based off anyone in particular.

6. How long did it take you to write Jacob’s Landing and can you describe the process from submissions to publication?

It usually takes me the better part of a school calendar year to write my first draft. I focus on producing a chapter per week to take to my writing group where we provide each other with feedback. The process from submission to publication is basically a big fat waiting game. A few sample chapters along with a letter to the publisher gets sent out. Because most editors read the submissions on their own time it can be anywhere from 3- 9 months before you hear back. Once you’ve been accepted with a publishing company the editor gives you and overview of what they like and don’t like about your story. The writer is then asked to do a re- write, taking everything into consideration. Once the editor is happy and you’re happy, things move rather quickly to line edits where the editor goes through every line with a fine tooth comb, making everything sound tighter. Words get deleted and questions get asked that the writer might not have thought about. I personally love the editing process. I don’t mind someone pointing out things I have missed or not thought about. At the end of the day the editor wants your story to be the best it can be. Trust is the name of the game.

7. With so many people choosing to self-publish these days, have you ever considered it as an option or do you prefer working with a publishing house?

I admire authors that have gone the self- publishing route, but I’m not as brave or confident enough to know that at the end of the day my work would be the best it could be. I’ve heard too many horror stories of self -publishing miss haps. For me I feel a great sense of comfort in knowing that certain things will be taken care of by the publishing house that I’m not so great at. I am not an editor for a reason.

8. Are you working on anything new and, if so, can you tell us a bit about it?

I’m a conflicted writer at the moment as I have three stories I want to write and I’m having trouble picking one to focus on. I have been given the extraordinary privilege of telling a story from the point of view of a young man with Asperger’s. I’m very excited and nervous about this project as it’s a huge undertaking. Another story is about a young girl in middle school who struggles with middle school stuff J and the third is a sequel to Jacob’s Landing. At present I’m waiting to hear back on two stories that are out in the ‘publishing universe.’   One is a sequel to Maxed Out and the other is story set in Belgium at a Convent run by Ursuline nuns – inspired by a friend in England who was raised by nuns after her mother died. When I was fourteen I was sent to a convent in Brussels while my dad was working overseas. The convent was rich with writing material.

9. Do you have any advice to pass along to writers who are not yet published?

Patience. Patience. Patience – is the name of the game. Writing is not for anyone who wants things to happen in a hurry or on your own time. If you’re willing to work hard, never give up, never get side swiped by the word NO – and if you love to write, then jump in and tread water like the rest of us. Learn everything you can about the craft of writing, join the Writers Federation of Nova Scotia, take courses, meet like- minded people, get feedback on your writing, enter competitions, put yourself out there and NEVER GIVE UP. You need to have thick skin and not take things personally. Keep a note pad with you at all times because your ideas will come to you in the strangest places, but most importantly enjoy the process of writing.

10. Is there anything else about Jacob’s Landing that you would like readers to know?

I’m thrilled to announce that Jacob’s landing is a Silver Birch Nominee by the Ontario Library Association. This is a huge deal in the ‘children’s writing world.’ It’s like getting nomination for the ‘People’s Choice Award,’ in TV land, except it’s for books and the children decide which book they like the best. Jacob’s Landing is one of ten books nominated and I feel incredibly blessed to be among the writers in this category.

Tanita Davis (YA blogger from California) summed up Jacob’s Landing so beautifully – I’ll give her the last word. : Like a perfect summer day – warm, but with just a kiss of breeze – Daphne Greer’s book celebrates the best things about foster care, family, friendships, and bridging the generations to make our own truths. This is a book you’ll want to hug.

!cid_7288C98B-A0D0-4073-A8F3-A908F0874800@NimbusJacob’s Landing  is available at  Amazon.ca,  Amazon.comChapters as well as Woozles in Halifax, the Box of Delights in Wolfville and most independent books stores.

To find out more about Daphne check out her website Here  

twitter: @daphne_greer

instragram : daphnegreerr

 

Writing Out the Crap

I know, I know, I know. It’s been awhile since I’ve written a post. Or maybe you didn’t notice, which is okay. I still love you. Why wouldn’t I? You’re my people!

All week long I’ve been mulling over ideas of what to write. The ideas seemed to ebb and flow with my moods as disappointment and challenges kicked in during the week. Some days I was ready to  dig in my heels and write an uplifting post, still other days I wanted to get up on my soapbox and spout off a little. You see, I have a real problem with all the unfairness in the world, of people behaving badly, or simply not having a thoughtful bone in their body. It bugs me and, honestly, sometimes makes me want to retreat from the world and pull the blanket up over my head.

But I have a secret weapon, one that allows me to work through the crap in my life. Yeah, you’ve got it—writing. I know that’s what you’d expect me to say—me being a writer and all—but I believe that we all need to give voice to some of the things that are troubling us from time to time. Some people are verbal and can articulate what’s on their mind very well. Other people are verbal and well…Maybe they need to give writing a try because it just gets a little messy otherwise.. You don’t have to be a fiction writer and make up stories, just writing down the everyday can often help. I don’t mean the I did this and went here and did that’s. I mean really, you’ve got to get into the meat of things, the stuff that bugs you, the people who ticked you off, the ones who broke your trust or were mean or simply haven’t got time for you.

I mentioned this to a teacher friend recently, this writing out the crap thing that I do from time to time. It helps, really it does. It frees me to come to a clean page and start a fresh new writing session when I’ve got things bugging me that I just can’t shake. I mean, how can you allow the words to flow when you’ve got a swell of emotions damned up inside you? Many times we keep churning that crap around in our heads all day. Some people do it at night. Some people do it all day and night. For me, there’s something powerful about writing out what I’m feeling when I’m encountering life’s disappointing times. And since no one is ever going to read it, I can whine and complain and lament to my heart’s content. Because seriously, if you live in the world, you’re going to experience some crap in your life. I don’t care who you are. Even if you appear to be the most happy, bubbly person in the world. And remember, when crap happens in your life you can have a secret weapon too! Try writing out that crap and see how you feel.

While I think of it, I love the lyrics to the song “Bleed Red” by Ronnie Dunn.  I’ve added them below. It reminds me to keep other people in mind as I go through my day, good or bad, and that I’m not the only person who’s having a crappy day. “We all bleed red–the words get stuck in my head from time to time when I’ve got things on my mind. I hope they resonate with you in some way, too.
 

Bleed Red

Let’s say were sorry, before it’s too late, give forgiveness a chance
Turn the anger into water; let it slip through our hands
We all bleed red, we all taste rain, all fall down, lose our way,
We all say words we regret, we all cry tears, we all bleed red

If we’re fighting, we’re both losing; we’re just wasting our time
Because my scars, they are your scars and your world is mine
You and I, we all bleed red, we all taste rain, all fall down, lose our way
We all say words, we regret, well cry tears, we all bleed red
Sometimes we’re strong, sometimes we’re weak, sometimes we’re hurt and it cuts deep
We live this life, breath to breath, we’re all the same; we all bleed red

Let’s say we’re sorry…
Before it’s too late…

We all bleed red, all taste rain, all fall down, lose our way,
We all say words we regret, we all cry tears we all bleed red,
Sometimes we’re strong, sometimes we’re weak; sometimes we’re hurt
It cuts deep; we live this life breath to breath; we’re all the same
We all bleed r-e-e-e-d-d-d

Oh, and to my Canadian readers, Happy Thanksgiving. If you’d like to share something you’re thankful for in the comments that would be great.

The Pumpkin Patch

Okay, so there are more than just pumpkins in the patch, there are also squash and, if you look closely, you’ll even see something that has us a little puzzled–zucchini that seem to have crossed with pumpkins. Is that even possible? Yeah, hubby thought the plants growing in the compost this spring were unique. Turns out they were. We even ended up with a couple of gourds.

We haven’t done a head count of the pumpkins and  squash, and have already given some away. I remember how much my son loved squash as a baby. Maybe we can give a few dozen to Levi!

And zucchini…oh, we still have zucchini looking for good homes. I just didn’t add them to the picture.

DSC06469

We’re near the end of September and that means harvest time. I absolutely love this time of year. I feel inspired in so many ways. Not only that, I have a character in my head who just doesn’t want to shut up. Most of the time it’s when I’m no where near my computer. Sheesh! Sometimes you’ve just have to let them rumble around your head and get all that ugly stuff off their chests.. How was I to know she had so much to say? But truthfully, I can’t imagine I was going to leave her out.

Funny, the things that come to us when we feel inspired. Speaking of inspiration, I’ll leave you with this inspiring quote by Ella Wheeler Wilcox.

With every deed you are sewing a seed, though the harvest you may not see. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Post—Darlene Foster

Today, it’s my pleasure to welcome Darlene Foster to my blog. Brought up on a ranch in southern Alberta, Darlene dreamt of travelling the world, meeting interesting people and writing stories. She is the author of the exciting adventure series featuring spunky 12 year-old Amanda Ross who loves to travel to unique places. Her books include: Amanda in Arabia – The Perfume Flask, Amanda in Spain – The Girl in The Painting, Amanda in England – The Missing Novel and Amanda in Alberta – The Writing on the Stone. Readers from seven to seventy enjoy travelling with Amanda as she unravels one mystery after another. Darlene and her husband divide their time between the west coast of Canada and Orihuela Costa, in Spain. She believes everyone is capable of making their dreams come true.

So without further ado, here’s Darlene!

                 

                                                                     The Joy of Writing for Children

SAM_1503

 

Writing for children is important to me because I want children to develop the same love of books I had as a child. A love that doesn’t fade with time. Children’s books create lifelong readers; readers who eventually buy adult books. Without children’s books there may be no market for adult books.

I began my love affair with words many years ago. Some of my fondest memories are being read to as a child, visiting the library, and discovering the ability to read by myself. I still have worn copies of favourite childhood books, such as The Bobbsey Twins, Little Women, Black Beauty and Anne of Green Gables; and revisit these old friends from time to time. Books and children go together like toast and jam, in my opinion. Since I never show up without a book as a gift, my grandchildren call me, The Book Gramma. It´s not surprising that I love to write for children.

One grandmother purchased a set of my Amanda travel/adventure books and sent me this email which made my heart sing:

My 12 year old granddaughter just finished your books. She loved them. We were camping and we kept telling her to put the books down and come and play. This is the first time I have seen her get so excited about a book. Your books have given her a love of reading. Thanks for the good reads.

While writing for children can be fun, it isn´t easy. You have to remove yourself from the adult world and think like a twenty-first century kid. Fortunately, I like to hang around kids, listen to the words they use, observe the gestures, the looks, the trends. I also enjoy reading current, middle reader books to see what sparks the interest of today’s young readers. Children notice things adults wouldn’t and could care less about things adults think are important. It’s necessary to get into their head space. And guess what? While I’m writing, I get to be a kid again – and I love it!

The main character in my first book, Amanda in Arabia-The Perfume Flask, is a Canadian girl who wishes for travel and adventure on her twelfth birthday. The next day she gets a ticket to fly to the United Arab Emirates to visit her aunt and uncle. There she has an adventure of a lifetime. One young reader said, “I want to know where Amanda will travel to next.” That motivated me to write Amanda in Spain-The Girl in The Painting.

I had so much fun writing about Amanda, her travels and escapades that I continued by writing Amanda in England-The Missing Novel. One day, while doing a presentation at a school, a student asked me, “Why doesn´t Amanda stay in Alberta and have an adventure?” I said, “That´s a great idea,” and wrote Amanda in Alberta – The Writing on the Stone. Kids are always giving me ideas. I am currently working on book number five. I have to, my young fans are expecting it.
It brings me much joy to write my books as these fans will grow up and buy adult books soon. Writers of children’s books are creating readers for life. It’s an important job and one I am happy to take on.

 

Thank you so much, Darlene. It was a pleasure to have you visit.

If you’d like to learn more about Darlene and her books check out her website blog Amazon

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