Next Time

I’ve got to admit, the passing of Wayne Dyer earlier this week had me feeling a little sad. I’ve most of his books and loved what he had to say. I surely looked up to this man.

A few years back, I went with a friend to one of his talks when he came to Halifax. I would have liked to have gone to meet him after the show, but we didn’t. We left with me longing to have met him on a more personal level. Afterward, I promised myself if I ever got the chance again, I wasn’t going to let it pass. Even if it was just to say “Hi” and get a close up photo. My mind was made up. Next time, things would to be different.

See where that thinking got me?

There’s something to be said about seizing the moment and not letting opportunities pass because, seriously, we never know when our encounter with someone is going to be our last. I should have learned that lesson many years ago on the day my father died. I was at the house when he left to go to town and I don’t even think I took time to say goodbye. (The day was busy. He was just going in to town and I’d likely see him later that day. If not that day, the next.) He never made it home.

We put too much dependence of these “next times” in life, giving ourselves and easy out. (No problem… I’ll just do it next time!) While that thinking is fine and dandy so long as we get that “next time”, but what about the “next times” that never materialize? Think of all those missed opportunities.

So, I’m going to try and change this. If I have something on my mind to tell someone I’m not going wait until the “next time.” No more “next times” for me if it’s at all possible. From now on “next time” has been wiped from my vocabulary. I’m going to be a “this time” kind of gal. If I have an urge to meet someone, to say hello, or to stop and talk a few moments, even when I’m in a hurry, I’m going to do it. This may not work all the time, I mean, sometimes we do need these “next times” in our lives, but I can almost be sure that many of my “next times” won’t be filled with regret later on. That’s all I can do.

I hope you’ll join me on Wednesday when author/blogger Darlene Foster pops in for a visit to talk about why she writes for children. Darlene’s the author of the Amanda Adventure Series for young readers. Hope to see you next time. Oops there’s that “next time” again!

The Biggest Roadblock Along the Road to Publication

IMAG0609I’ve been thinking a lot about the writing process these past few days. As I sifted through some older writing files and reread some of my stories that had been published in literary magazines, I was reminded of that time when publication was only a dream—a dream that felt so very far away.
Yet a dream I was sure would come true…
…one day


Over time, as the rejections mounted, as the dream began to look a little fuzzy, I came to a realization about my writing, something that writers don’t often want to admit:

The biggest road block, the thing that was keeping me from being a published author was me.

Yup, that’s right, little ole me.

While there were things I was more than willing to work on—my writing being one of those things—something else was preventing me from being published. I was inadvertently placing road blocks in the way, not because I didn’t want to be published (Lordy, but I wanted it) but because, on some level, I was afraid of it. Fear is the one thing that has the power to hold us back, to keep us from realizing our dreams, and no matter how badly we might want something, we’ll allow that very same fear to put obstacles in our way and keep our dreams from coming true.

I think of these fear-based obstacles as roadblocks because they do just that—they block our path and prevent us from continuing our journey toward publication. When the obstacles show up along the road we can either let these roadblocks stop us or we can figure a way to get past them. And in order to do that it’s important to recognize these roadblocks when we come up against them.

Here are a few of the road blocks I’ve encountered in the past, ones that I unknowingly placed in my path.

1.Procrastination: Believe me when I say I can procrastinate with the best of them. I’ve had plenty of practice, too. There is always something else to do. That something else might very well be important, like spending time with my family or friends, or it could be something as insignificant as watching reruns of The Big Bang Theory. If you want to be published you need to make writing one of your priorities. REPEAT WITH ME. “If I want to be published I need to make writing one of my priorities.” You may not be able to write each and every day, but you need to make an effort even on those days when you don’t feel as though you have a literary bone in your body. Even ten or fifteen minutes of writing are better than no minutes. Remember, if you can’t publish what never gets written. No one’s going to publish blank pages. Sounds like a no-brainer to me!

2. Believing that you are not worthy of publication: This is a biggie. Too many of us struggle with this. While there are a few writers out there who have unrealistic goals, like signing a million-dollar book contract prior to publication when their writing needs much more work to make it publishable, many more writers struggle with the belief that their writing will never be quite good enough for publication. I’m here to tell you, in order to succeed in writing you have to believe that you are worthy of success. REPEAT WITH ME : “In order to succeed in writing I have to believe that I am worthy of success.” If you’re inner dialogue is constantly telling you something different, you need to give yourself a good talking to. Nothing good is ever accomplished beneath a cloak of negativity. Believe you are worthy because you are. Why wouldn’t you be?

3.Not owning it: If you’re a writer, admit it. Don’t gush over the fact, stammer and stumble to get the words out, own up to it. When I say, own it, I don’t mean for you to shout it from the rooftops because that would just annoy the heck out of everyone, I mean accept once and for all that you are a writer. Forget all that once-I’m-published-I’ll-be-a-writer nonsense. Every published writer was once an unpublished writer. They didn’t become a writer the moment their words were printed, they were writers before that. REPEAT WITH ME: “Every published writer was once an unpublished writer.” Did you think all writers were born with publishing credits? No sir, not a one. They worked at their writing until it was good enough for publication. But here’s a little truth, sometimes even publication isn’t enough to make you feel like a writer. I know, sounds silly. Certainly to be published is to be a writer, right? Yet I can tell you that I had several stories published before I finally, finally admitted that I was a writer. So do yourself a favour and admit it before publication, that way it won’t come as such a shock when you’re holding that first published story in your hands.

4. Saying you’re a writer but not really feeling it: Feeling that you’re a writer means much more than simply saying the words, “I’m a writer.” Anyone can do that, writer or non-writer. Don’t get me wrong, while it’s good to say the words, important even, it means very little if we simply do not feel it. REPEAT WITH ME: Feeling that I’m a writer is more important than just saying it. The day I actually felt like a writer, really and truly felt like one, was the day something momentous happened in my writing life. More and more of my stories were accepted for publication but, more importantly, the rejections that came afterward stopped stinging. I came to understand that rejection wasn’t necessarily a commentary of my work, but simply a story that didn’t catch the attention of the right editor on the right day. Finally, I stopped taking those rejections so personally.

While some of these may or may not be roadblocks you’ll encounter along the way, I feel as though we often underestimate our own self-worth. And when we’re not at a particular place in life when we want to be, we often end up beating ourselves up because of it. Maybe we even decide that it’s just too hard, that we’ll never get there. But we all take our own time getting places–that’s all part of life. Some stories take longer than others to polish. It’s always important to have someone in your corner. Isn’t it only fitting for you to be that someone?

What are some of the roadblocks you’ve encountered along the road to publication

This and That

Today, I had the privilege of reading from, “Flying With a Broken Wing” to the Central Valley Homeschoolers Association at the Wolfville Library. It always nice to meet people who are supportive of local authors. I had a wonderful time, and to tell the truth it’s the first time I’ve read to a group of children and their mom’s. Usually my audience is made up of adults so it was wonderful to read for my target audience. Lots of questions were asked and we had a great discussion. I have to say I have such deep respect for homeschooling families. I’m sure it takes a great deal of dedication, discipline and commitment, not only for the parents (God love them to pieces) but the kids. I`m in awe!

The winter edition of TRANSITION magazine is now up. Yay! You can read my short fiction piece, “Preparations” by following the link HERE. FYI I’m on page 12. I ‘ve been a contributor to this magazine on several occasions. I think it’s a wonderful publication. To use the words from their website:

TRANSITION is a magazine which publishes two kinds of works: those directly about mental health issues; and those about the individual’s personal experience of those same issues. Both kinds of works celebrate lives in transit – lives of change, growth, and transformation.

Concerning TRANSITION, I’ll have a bit more news about this at a later date. So I’ll keep you posted with what’s going on there. Sorry, to sound so mysterious but I’ll share when I can. For any writers out there you can check out the magazine at the link provided.

And, since it was pointed out to me today, (thanks Maureen!) that my “about” page hasn’t been updated since  before “Flying With a Broken Wing” was published I figured it was long past due. I`m no longer awaiting the publication of my book, as you know.  :D

So, that`s this and that for today.

10 Ways to Avoid Buying That Author’s Book

We’ve all been to those events, you know the ones, where local authors are set up pedaling their wares. It can be kind of uncomfortable for the average won’t-be-book-buyer. Especially when said author is located in a spot that you have to pass on your way to where you’re going. I mean, there they are sitting out in front of the bookstore in the mall, or at some festival or fair or market that has absolutely nothing to do with books. What the heck’s all that about anyway, right? What nerve, what gall. It’ kind of like being ambushed if I’m being perfectly honest. You know. You’ve felt it. It’s not like you’re expecting someone to be selling books, least of all the author of those very books.

Well, fear no more. Over the past five years of attending book signing and some of those a fore-mentioned “other events” I’ve learned a thing or two when it comes to not buying that author’s book. Actually, it’s not all that complicated. You just have to know the right thing to say and the proper way to carry yourself. Keep your wits about you and above all don’t panic. You’ll survive. I promise.

So, for all of you won’t- be-book-buyers these next 10 excuses are for you.

1. Listen to that little voice in your head. You know, the one that says, “Tell her you don’t read.” Who can argue with that? If you don’t read, you don’t read. Case closed. Keep on a walking, my friend, you’re in the clear, maybe even click your heels as you’re walking away. You’re so cool– you, you , person who just does not read.

2. Stop at her table for a few moments. Gently run you hand over the books. Appear interested, but not too, too interested. Slip in a comment such as, “One day I’ll have to invest.” The author will be giddy thinking that you’re talking about actually buying one of her books when in reality you’re talking about opening up an RRSP. She’ll never know the difference.

3. Ask her if the book in the bookstores. When she says yes, tell her that you’ll probably pick one up there some time in the future. She’ll love you for it, and by throwing that word, “probably” in there you’re getting off without a true commitment. Clever.

4. Ask for a full synopsis of the books on her table. Trust me, authors love that part. Leaf through the books one by one. Read a few passages, silently. Ask what age group it’s for. If she says young adult simply mention that your grandchildren are too young. If she says middle grade just say the opposite. She can’t argue the age-appropriateness of her books, right?

5. Remember, appearing interested will always endear that author to you. She’ll probably believe whatever you have to say. Ask if her books are fiction or non-fiction. If she says fiction, you know what you have to do. Sound rather disappointed and say, “Gee, I only read non-fiction.” If she writes non-fiction, you get the picture, tell her you only read fiction. Now if she happens to write both fiction and non-fiction you need a back-up excuse because if you don’t come up with something quickly you may just end up having to make a purchase. But have no fear, when all else fails here’s a handy, dandy excuse that will always work in a pinch…..

6. “I don’t have any cash on me or else I’d get one.” Remember, adding that little, “or else I’d get one,” will show her you’re serious. Can’t argue the no money excuse.

7. Another dandy excuse that often works well is this: Stop at her table and pretend you’ve already read her books. Her smile will be like a ray of sunshine, especially when you mention how much you enjoyed them. But for God’s sake don’t overdo it. She may just ask you what your favourite part is and the jig will be up. You’ll need make a quick exit. Fake chest pain if you must, but scram tout suite.

8. Stop at her table and introduce yourself. Tell her you have a book coming out next week. She won’t know the difference. Authors love other authors. Chances are she’ll congratulate the hell out of you because all authors know just how difficult it is to find a publisher after that book is written. And you know what, after all that congratulating is over, she won’t even care about selling her book. She’ll be just itching to buy yours. Now that’s a plan!

9. Promise to come back a little later. Find out how long she’ll be there to make sure you don’t happen to stumble on through before she’s done for the day. I mean, she’ll never see you again, right?

10. Remember, you can always distract her by talking about the weather. Weather talk always works no matter where you go. You don’t have to be weather-lady Cindy Day to appreciate the local Maritime weather. Canadians can talk forever about the weather. We’ve had plenty of practice. Throw in a, “I heard we’re going to have an early winter,” and you could keep her talking forever.  Book talk will always take a back seat to weather talk. Trust me. I’ve fallen for that one, myself, a time or two.

So there you have it, all the excuses you should ever need to avoid buying that author’s book. One final little tip I’ll leave you all with. If words happen to fail you, hey, we can’t all be wordsmiths, here’s something that will always get you out of buying that author’s book. Resist making eye contact. Keep trucking right on by that author’s table. It’s not like she’s going to jump out and stop you from passing. It’s simple, just pretend she’s not there. Make her feel invisible and she’ll probably believe she is. So long as you don’t slow your gait, you’re in for smooth sailing but, above all, remember not to look. Not even a sideways glance. If she detects even the slightest bit of acknowledgement on your part she’ll be smiling her face off to try and get your attention. She might even say hello. If you get that friendly hello all your hard work could go down the drain. Just saying.

So there you have it. 10, or actually 11, ways to avoid buying that author’s book.

Now it’s your turn. Can you think of any other ways to avoid buying that author’s book? I’d love it if you’d share some of your experiences. Or just come up with some inventive things to be silly like I did.

Emergency Book Signing–Sometimes You Have to Go That Extra Mile or Thirty

Yes, I did say emergency book signing! Sounds strange, I know, but life is filled with strange and unusually things. Some days even the smallest thing can miraculously turn into an emergency especially when there’s a book involved.

Sometimes the really cool things about being an author are the strange things that can happen on an ordinary day. Monday was such a day, ordinary and plain as white bread, not even toasted and buttered. But then I checked the messages on my phone when I got home from work. There was one from the local bookstore. (Bear in mind when I say “local” I mean it’s still about a 45 minute drive from where I am.) The owner said the most bazaar thing had just happened. A customer came in and bought the last copy of “Flying With a Broken Wing,” and the very next customer in line wanted that same book. She was calling to ask if I had books on hand and if it was possible to make some arrangements to get them. Apparently, the customer was quite disappointed to learn that the last copy ( a signed on at that) had just sold as she’d wanted it to take it to her daughter in Ontario— her daughter, as it turns out, was someone I had gone to school with. Now, there’s a bit more to this as it just so happens that this very same lady taught one of my daughters, actually shared a birthday with her, and always gave my daughter a birthday card all the while she was in elementary school. Nice, huh? I always thought so.

So here was the dilemma, the lady would really like signed copies of both my books but was leaving for Ontario in a few days. This meant the books wouldn’t arrive from the publisher, certainly not in time for me to come out and sign them, before she left. The bookstore owner suggested that I mail out the copies. I explained that I was 20 minutes from a post office and I work through the day. I chewed the situation over the next day at work and decided I’d take a drive out. The bookstore owner was going to buy my copies and keep the ones she had on order for her store. So that’s what I did. I made a quick trip out and delivered the books inscribed with a little message.

Now I know some people might think that it was silly of me to go out of my way to make sure this person got signed copies. She would have taken the books anyway (her husband was going to meet her in Ontario a few days later and the copies would be in from the publisher by that time), but sometimes you’ve just got to do what feels right and this felt like the right thing.

Have you ever noticed that Karma has a way of coming back, sometimes years later, and often in a good way? Many times, it’s those little things that make up for the disappointments we feel along the way. Having people specifically ask for my book, and to have it signed, is really an amazing thing. In the grand scheme of things, I believe all those little things add up to a great deal, at least in this author’s life!

Has anything small made your day recently? I love it when you share your stories.

10 Things You Should Never Say to an Author

I’ve been an author for more years that I have admitted to. For a long time no one knew my secret. I was published and still no one knew. Did I say no one? I mean very few. I didn’t mind that. Knowing my work was published was enough for this gal. Life was good; simple and good.

But then the book.

You know the one— Bitter, Sweet. My secret was finally out. There was no going back.
Now, with two novels under my belt I’ve gained a little wisdom. Not only have I spoken to a lot of other authors, but I’ve made a few observations along the way. People often say some far out there things to authors without even being aware of it. Sometimes things come out of their mouths before they can stop themselves. One thing I’ve discovered along the way is there are things that are best not said to an author whether you’re meeting an author for the first time or if they happen to be in your circle of friends. Etiquette, my peeps. Sometimes we all need to show a little etiquette. That said, I wanted to have a little fun with this. A good sense of humour goes a long ways, not only in the publishing business, but with life in general.

So, for fun, I’ve listed some actual things that have been said to authors I’ve met in my journey, a sharing of stories if you will. And since words never come out sounding quite the way they were intended— I know that. You know that. Even the neighbour’s cat knows that—- I’ve also listed what you probably meant to say. We authors are an understanding bunch, always willing to give someone the benefit of the doubt. Sometimes you’re nervous when meeting an author and that clever first line you took a whole five seconds coming up with doesn’t come out sounding so clever. So here goes.

1. I thought you’d be taller. No kidding. I thought I’d be taller, too. But hey, my mum and dad were short, and you know what they say— genetics can be a bitch. Ooops. Did I just say that? Here’s the scoop. It’s difficult to determine how tall someone is by looking at their author photo. In fact, it’s down right impossible unless you’ve got a crystal ball.
What you probably meant to say was:
I’m so glad to meet you. Your books are wonderful!
2. I have to say I liked your other book better. Have to say? You really have to say that? Okay, so authors are keen at reading between the lines. I mean, lines are our specialty. So what you’re really telling me is, what, you didn’t like the book? Not only that, you felt I needed to know this for some reason? But of course you didn’t mean that at all, did you?. We authors can jump to all sorts of conclusions. Our egos are fragile. We often think the worse, and you would never, ever want to shatter an author’s oh- so- fragile-ego. Of course not!
What you probably meant to say was:
I have to say your first/second/third/fourth book was my favourite!
3. Can I get your book from the bookmobile? In author language this translates into I’m too cheap to buy your book.
What you probably meant to say was: I sure hope your book will be available at the libraries and bookmobiles, too! You’ll pick up a lot of readers that way.
4. Can you sign this copy for me? I just got it at a yard sale. It was a real steal for a buck. There’s nothing wrong with getting a deal on a book. I do that myself whenever possible. Not sure I’d announce to the author at a book signing that I just bought his book for a dollar. Sometimes you just have to keep those sweet deals to yourself.
What you probably meant to say was: I’d love to have this book autographed.
5. I just entered a giveaway for your book, but if I win I’m not sure what I’ll do with it. Really? You’re worried that if you actually won a free, probably autographed book, you don’t know anyone you could give it too? I assume that’s because you already have your own copy, right? But really, no one person on planet earth would want my book. Not a friend or family member, your doctor’s secretary, the mailman, some bum on the street?
What you probably meant to say was: Even though I have my own copy, I wanted to show my support so I entered the giveaway. I know someone who would love a signed copy!
6. I tried to think of someone I could buy a copy of your book for, but I didn’t know anyone who would want it, and I was too mean to spend the money on myself. Yeah, kind of sad. You don’t think you’re worth 12 bucks, the price of my book. That really makes me sad.
What you probably meant to say was: My friends and family all have a copy of your book!
7. How many copies has your book sold? Authors don’t like talking about book sales unless they have bragging rights that would knock your socks off a chimpanzee and, believe me, most of us don’t. Everyone wants to believe that you’re making millions on that book because we all know that authors are all filthy rich. Right? Wrong.
What you probably meant to say was: I hope your book sells a million copies!
8. Ive written a novel. Can you take a look at it? Sorry, but darn near everyone has written a novel at one time or other. If we authors read them all, well…what do you think?
What you probably meant to say was: It’s wonderful to meet a fellow writer.
9. No one wants the novel I’ve written. I’m just not famous enough. Why don’t you rewrite the story? You can have all the royalties. I’d just like to see it published. I can’t speak for all authors, but usually we like to come up with our own ideas. It can be a sticky situations with copyright laws, etc. Not to mention the story that you’re passionate about might not hold that same appeal for someone else.
What you probably meant to say was: I’m in awe of someone who can get their novel published. Good for you!
10. They say everyone has one story in them. Yes, that’s what they do say, and that might very well be true. But you’ve got to ask yourself is it a story anyone else would want to read? Be honest. If it’s an epic tale about your first trip to the farmer’s market or the summer you learned to knit, you probably won’t have a very big readership for that one story of yours.
What you probably meant to say was: Congratulations. Getting published is no easy feat. May all good things come your way.

So there you have it. Ten things not to say to an author, and just in case you find yourself ready to make a faux pas you now know what to say in its place. I hope you had fun reading along.

Have you ever said something to an author you hadn’t intended to? If you’re an author has someone ever said something to you that could have been misunderstood? Perhaps you can think of something you should never say to an author. Please share if you do!

The Reader Behind That Review You Hated

My last post was about the author behind the book you hated, but in order to make this issue a bit balanced, I decided to write a post about the reviewer. When a bad review comes along, authors probably don’t stop to think about the person who actually took the time to put that review out there and what their purpose was in writing a bad review.

Right now, I’ll tell you that I don’t rate or review books and I’m sure some of you may think I have no business writing a post about the reviewer. Luckily, this is my blog so what I say goes!

Sometimes, I’m completely confused about some of the reviews I’ve read online, especially those reviews for some of the books I absolutely loved. Is that the same book I read? Nope…couldn’t possible be. But it is!  People see things in totally different ways. Just as all writers bring something different to the page so do all readers.

A friend of mine told me she had a difficult time with my last book because she grew up in a home where alcohol was a really big issue and, like the protagonist, Cammie, she didn’t know who her father was. I totally understood why she might find, “Flying with a Broken Wing” a difficult read. Cammie’s aunt Millie is a bootlegger, after all, but I never would have thought of this book as being “difficult” for anyone to read. Many people have found it funny, in fact.  Still, her comment opened my eyes a little bit to the experience that each reader brings to a book. There could be many reasons why someone disliked a book or even wrote a bad review that might not have a thing to do with the story or the writing itself. Perhaps there was something in the book that reminded them of a bad experience they had or one of the characters reminded them of someone who made their lives miserable and they just couldn’t get past that.

We can’t know what all makes up that reader’s life experience, who they are and where they’ve been. Did they grow up in a loving household? Maybe they’re unwell or feeling unloved or lonely. There are so many factors that could go into this. Perhaps the only way they have of expressing their negative feelings is to lash out in words. Perhaps again, they feel an obligation to warn other readers that they’re about to waste their valuable time reading that 500 page book that they determined was gibberish.

One thing I have come to understand about this world I live in and my experience in it, my opinion, and my expression of that opinion, is only important to me (and perhaps the sacred few who value what that opinion might be.) I have lived long enough to know that, while opinions are sometimes important, many times they really are not. What I like or what I don’t like makes absolutely no difference in the big scheme of things. We won’t all like the same book, any more than we’ll all like the same clothes or food or cars or people. Thank goodness!

I’m all for responsible reviews where a reviewer is able to give their opinion about a book, maybe even point out some obvious flaws if they feel so inclined, hopefully in a constructive way. It’s important. Diversity makes this world a better place to live.

Any writer will agree that expressing yourself through words is important. We were born to communicate, but communicating in a responsible way only makes you look classy and maybe earns you some respect along the way if you care about those things. Truthfully, those things aren’t important to everyone. I know that.

I love what author Sue Harrison had to say about my last post. If a novel is too horrible, I simply don’t review it. Why break somebody’s heart because of my (perhaps erroneous) opinion!?!”   Smart lady!

Have you ever given consideration to the reader behind the review? Has your own life experiences ever influenced your reading experience when it came to a certain book? Have you ever wondered about the reader behind that bad review?

The Author Behind That Book You Hate

As young reader I can’t recall ever reading a book and thinking it was horrible. I was much more accepting, much more willing to read a book with open eyes, not critically looking and examining what I believed to be faults in the story or the writing. I just read for the love of reading. I accepted the story for what it was. But then, that’s the beauty of youth, the way we keep our minds and hearts open, and simply allow stories to entertain us without judgment or malice. Weren’t we just the cutest things back then?

Today, it doesn’t seem to be that way. People are reading and reviewing and rating (they have every right to of course) but a part of me can’t help but wonder what happened to plain old reading for enjoyment. Why does everything have to be rated and what it the purpose behind these ratings? Some argue that it helps them decide if they want to read a book, but with so many varying opinions how could you possibly decide if a book is beautifully written or not and worth your time? If twenty people rave on about a book, there are bound to be some who absolutely hate it. Guaranteed.

Having your work out there to be scrutinized by others isn’t the easiest thing in the world, people. Ask any author. But it’s part of the territory, like it or lump it. We write the best story we can and, God willing, we might be able to share it with others. But there’s always going to be someone who won’t care about the work you put into it or what it means to the author to be able to express themselves with the written word. I’m not sure there is any other craft out there that comes under fire the way writing does. People can get nasty. I’ve seen it, myself, in the reviews of some of my favourite books and I wonder what would cause another person to write such nastiness. I’m all for honest reviews. If someone didn’t like a book they didn’t like it.

Behind every book, good or bad, there is a person. Someone who put their heart and soul into the story they want to tell. Hopefully, people will one day read it. And when/if they do, they’ll form opinions. They’ll either like it or they won’t. One thing I know for sure is, we won’t like every book we read, no more than everyone will like the book we write. It’s a fact of life. But being an author, I try to be as objective as I can and while I won’t like every book I read, I certainly respect the writer for creating it. Many, many hours goes into the writing of a book. We write and then we rewrite. Then rewrite some more. It’s a craft worthy of respect.

Honestly, I never used to think about the author behind the book until I became an author myself. I never wondered who they were or what kind of life they had. I only ever thought of them as an author, as if writing was their entire life. Of course, today, an author bio is on the back of books and we can get a small glimpse of who that person behind the book is. But that doesn’t tell a complete story. No bio I’ve read has ever told me that an author is trustworthy, honest or loyal. Or that they’re warm or caring and have a heart as big as the outdoors. I’ve not read a bio that told me how the author worked at perfecting his/her craft, working through the pain of rejection to produce something they truly believe in. Nor would you read in an author bio that someone’s nasty review was so hurtful that the author never wrote that second or third book because they stopped after number one. Nope, you won’t find any of those things in a bio. Although I’m not sure many people would even be interested in any of that and I’m sorry for sounding a little bit cynical at the moment

So while I don’t expect you all to love every book you read maybe you might stop for a moment and consider the author behind that book you either loved or hated.


Have you ever given any thought to the author behind the book you loved or  hate? Do you consider the idea that the reviews you write might be read by the author? Would you care?

What’s the Book About?

One of the toughest questions for any author to answer is , “What’ your book about?” Whenever that question gets asked we struggle to sum up our writing in a few words. Don’t ask me why. We’re used to writing synposes for our books so you’d think we’d be able to rattle off a brief summary as soon as that question is asked.

So, what’s “Flying with a Broken Wing” about? I’ll let the Nimbus fall catalogue tell you. (I’m on page 20 BTW.) Sorry, the qualityof the photo isn’t so good, but it’s better than a finger in the eye as they say.


So there you have it. A quick peek into my book and what it’s about. Guess it’s  happening after all! Yippee!

Rug Hooker Extraordinaire


The lampshades below were also hooked by Syr!

I’m always amazed at those people who have more than one exceptional talent. Maybe that’s because I don’t venture very far from writing myself, and I forget that many others do. While I’ve known author, Syr Ruus (Love Songs of Emmanuel Taggart) for several years now, I’ve only recently discovered her talent for rug hooking. Imagine my delight when I discovered that she was having a show of her hooked rugs!

Yesterday, we drove to Petite Reviere to attend Syr’s opening at the River House Gallery. We were totally amazed by Syr’s work. Here are a few snaps I took to share with my blog readers.


Syr’s work will be on display at the River House Gallery during the month of April. If you get a chance , I suggest you drop in and take a look at the work from this local artist. There are many more rugs on display for your enjoyment. There are also copies of her book, “Love Songs of Emmanuel Taggart” for sale at the gallery if you’re interested in supporting a local author. You can check out Syr’s Facebook page as well to learn more about this talented writer/rug hooker.

Syr Ruus, Author

DSC03498  Congratulations, Syr, on the success of your rug hooking exhibition. We had a lovely time!

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